"Rogers-Barnes. It does have a nice ring to it."

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#stucky  #otp  

headcanonacceptegd:

I love how rock lee is just like “I’m not using any type of jutsu. There is no trick. I’m straight up beating your punk ass”

(via bilbobruhggins)

thegoatmessiah:

elizakaze:

ah yeah. sorry, my bad. I personally favour Tarantino’s films that aren’t as much of a combination or a parody of a genre/genres but more experimental with the storytelling itself such as Reservoir Dogs.

as for Ant-man, I think you might be right. Just sad that he worked on that for 6 years and then someone in the production ladder drops a bomb like that. I guess that’s Hollywood then. Wright is welcome back to Europe anytime and hopefully we’ll get to see more stuff from him sooner or later.

Not a problem! And me too. I think Kill Bill is visually interesting, but it lacks the layers that most Tarantino movies have. Though I do think Django:Unchained held up, even though it was another spaghetti western blend. My personal favorite has to be Inglorious Bastards, though, but it changes frequently.

Yeah, I was really looking forward to seeing him work with a bigger budget, since it was so interesting to the technical differences between Shaun of the Dead/Hot Fuzz and Scott Pilgrim/The World’s End. Still, I think the end product would be more fun if he had a bigger part in writing the film. 

Yeah, I agree. I should watch more of his movies though since I haven’t seen even nearly all of them yet.

I think it would be most important that Wright could work closely with the original writer/text, but since he had been in Ant-man project for several years I have a feeling that there was very close cooperation with the screenwriter(s). After all ‘the cornetto trilogy’ was co-written with Simon as well. Even if Ant-man could have been a good step out of Wright’s comfort zone and a big thing for his international career I’m also afraid that indeed, MCU – neither the fandom or the business – might not be ready for an affectionate parody just yet. But like you said, would have been cool to see what kind of doors a bigger budget would have opened both story-wise and in visual aspect.

Let’s hope he will soon grab another project where he has more space as a writer.

  July 23, 2014 at 01:37pm

super-geek:

I’ve talked numerous times about this scene - about that smile. That disbelieving, reluctantly fond smile. The beginning of their relationship unfolding and growing and strengthening here in this one night, over cold beer and warm conversation and simple companionship; quiet company, someone to just sit and share space with where before both of their lives were empty chairs and silence.

Danny’s readiness to just listen to whatever Nicholas has to say, his eagerness to learn Nicholas, must be something Nicholas just isn’t used to. Nicholas has spent his life excelling, being the best, and people don’t like that, not in his experience. But then here’s this man, this seemingly simple man, reaching out to him. He isn’t mocking, he isn’t trying to knock Nicholas down or demean Nicholas’s achievements in an attempt to make himself feel better. He’s asking about Nicholas’s life, and he’s genuinely interested. He’s probably the first person to look at Nicholas and be amazed instead of defensive; friendly (even a little in awe) instead of sneering. And Nicholas - he puts down his notepad, he stops working, and he focuses entirely on Danny. This is the moment we see Nicholas’s attention shift.

Before this night, and these drinks, and this conversation, he’s Nicholas Angel: Police Officer. But here, we see him soften; we see him open up to Danny and share a part of his childhood, we see him drink enough to get a little drunk, we see him relax, we see him have fun.

This scene, to me, is where Nicholas’s character really grows. Danny is affectionate, loyal, and kind, and he wants nothing in return, and Nicholas - who has spent his life in bustling London, where people are always in too much of a rush to bother with even basic manners, being constantly exposed to criminals and troublemakers - is unaccustomed to this simple, genuine friendliness, and is charmed by it. This is the moment both Nicholas and Danny finally find someone to share their lives with, and it’s wonderful.

203,449 plays

danny-deneato:

(via bilbobruhggins)

here’s a person who has never watched more than a few minutes of Twin Peaks yet listens to the tv series soundtrack like ‘hmm I could listen to the soundtrack, I have no idea what it’s like but let’s do it’, reblogs twin peaks fanart from time to time and looks for fanmixes of the very same show.

I’m just here for the murder and gloom and don’t know anything sorry

  July 23, 2014 at 10:13am

videogrrl:

dont ask me about my sexuality youre not gonna get a straight answer

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#q  

x

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  July 23, 2014 at 08:33am
via keptyn
I was actually referring to genre blending, which Tarantino is known for (for example, the Kill Bill films combined the…

ah yeah. sorry, my bad. I read your question a bit carelessly (rly tired atm). I personally favour Tarantino’s films that aren’t as much of a combination or a parody of a genre/genres but more experimental with the storytelling itself such as Reservoir Dogs.

as for Ant-man, I think you might be right. Just sad that he worked on that for 6 years and then someone in the production ladder drops a bomb like that. I guess that’s Hollywood then. Wright is welcome back to Europe anytime and hopefully we’ll get to see more stuff from him sooner or later.

  July 23, 2014 at 12:26am

thegoatmessiah asked: I actually noticed that genre blending like that is really common in Edgar Wright's film, especially in matters of structure. Do you think that's why Tarantino is such a fan of his work?

oooh I can think of various reasons for that. Both indeed have usually an uncommon structure in their films but Wright is more traditional with timelines whereas Tarantino basically just blows those up. Pulp Fiction is a good example for that. Wright plays more with the genre tropes in general, whereas you can’t really explain many Tarantino films in a few words like ‘british romantic zombie comedy’. Their films have very different pacing too and have very little similarities that way.

I think that Wright’s unique and well working visual humor might be the biggest reason here, though. His understanding for different kind of angles, the use of different kind of moving camera (Hot Fuzz was the first British feature to have a shot recorded with the camera on a segway, haha) and the incredible amount of shots per scene often with varying frame rates, zooms (that were supposed to go out of fashion in the 70’s!) and understanding of closeups would be a good reason too. Mixing up genres in a way that works is what makes Wright special as well. This is one reason why I’m super sad that Ant-man is not happening with him.<_>

I honestly can’t think of a reason why Tarantino – or any other director for that matter – wouldn’t be a fan of Wright. Even if they are quite different storytellers, I think they have a lot in common as directors.

  July 22, 2014 at 11:55pm

image

Ooh you know what? This calls for a scene breakdown! and I’m not doing this only because I’m sad piece of trash but I also study this shit so…education who am I kidding this is all because of the homo.

First of all, you’re absolutely on the right track. In the scene ‘Avenging Angel’ or particularly this part  you can see a few shots that have obvious romantic comedy tropes used in them. The scene overall has something about 3000000+ shots and I’m not going to list all of them and you should watch the scene yourself, but here’s a few. Sorry it came out really long.

Read More

  July 22, 2014 at 10:36pm

luciawestwick:

The Imitation Game - Official UK Teaser Trailer (x)

(via accio-sh)

this wasn’t planned.

  July 22, 2014 at 10:09pm

duckbuckets:

Specific Rim

It’s just two and a half hours of newt correcting people on kaiju facts

(via namara-ashina)